Celebrities reveal childhood dream jobs for Guide Dogs' ‘Every Dream Counts’ 

Celebrities have been revealing their childhood dream jobs and pictures of themselves when they were young in support of Guide Dogs’ ‘Every Dream Counts’ campaign.


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The most popular dream jobs for children today

Oscar-winning actress Olivia Colman, Dame Joanna Lumley and comedian Paul O’Grady are among those who have shared their dream jobs as part of our campaign to help children with a visual impairment realise and achieve their dreams. 

Olivia Colman, who revealed she thought she’d be a nurse, said: “When you are little an exciting rite of passage is to dream about what you’ll be when you grow up. It’s great that Guide Dogs is supporting and empowering children with a vision impairment to make their dreams a reality.” 

It follows the results of our nationwide survey of parents and children that found the most desired career for modern kids is to be a “YouTuber”. As many as 27 percent cited this as their ideal vocation alongside other “top” jobs including being an influencer (17 percent), professional footballer (16 percent) and professional gamer (15 percent) according to the study of 1,700 children aged seven to 12, and their parents. Zookeeper (14 percent), dancer (ten percent), artist (ten percent) and actor (ten percent) also featured high in the list of modern kids’ dream jobs, according to the study. 

The research also polled visually impaired children on their dream careers, with over one in ten (11 percent) citing being a footballer as their dream job. This was closely followed by being a vet (10 percent) and doctor (10 percent). Policeman (6 percent) and scientist (6 percent) ranked in the top five careers for visually impaired children too. 

When you are little an exciting rite of passage is to dream about what you’ll be when you grow up. It’s great that Guide Dogs is supporting and empowering children with a vision impairment to make their dreams a reality.
Olivia Colman

More role models needed for children with sight loss

Barriers that parents said could get in the way of their visually impaired children’s dreams included the lack of inspiring role models with visual impairments to inspire their child (45 percent), while 43 percent said they just don’t feel the world is inclusive enough for people with visual disabilities. 

71 percent feel there aren’t enough people in the public eye with a visual impairment or disability to inspire others, while eight in ten admit that people with disabilities aren’t very visible within society. So it’s no surprise that 69 percent of children who are visually impaired are concerned about their disability holding them back from finding the job of their dreams.

Kerry Kernan, National Operations Manager of CYP (Children & Young People) Services at Guide Dogs, said: “This research reveals what modern kids want to do when they grow up - and it’s a far cry from the dreams of previous generations, who wanted to be train drivers, doctors, explorers and inventors. It’s also brilliant to see that the sky really is the limit for visually impaired children, with the research uncovering some really aspirational, dream careers.”

“At Guide Dogs, we work with blind and visually impaired children, and their families, from the day they are born, to help them live a life without barriers and achieve their dreams. Every year we help hundreds of families build their knowledge and confidence and provide tools that are right for each family’s specific needs – whether that’s through enabling more moments like inclusive reading, or by providing services like habilitation support, education support or grants for parents and children to access new technology.”

What celebrities wanted to be when they grew up

Help children with sight loss realise their dreams and make every day count with a monthly donation to our children and young people’s services

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