Assistance dogs (UK) ID book

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Most guide and assistance dog owners in the UK who are trained by organisations, that are members of Assistance Dogs UK, will have been issued with an Assistance Dogs (UK) branded ID book.

This ID book has been designed to support guide and assistance dog owners with their access to goods, facilities and services, as defined in the UK Equality Act 2010 or Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995.

The ID book contains information about the owner and their dog and details of the training organisation who trained the dog and its owner. It also has information about the law and the elements which support the rights of assistance dog owners and their dog, especially when accessing goods, facilities and services, including reference to the Equality Act 2010 and Disability Discrimination ACT 1995.

UK guide and assistance dog training organisations, who are members of Assistance Dogs UK, will have issued identification books to their guide or assistance dog owners. These Assistance Dogs UK branded ID books with their yellow cover will provide airlines with sufficient information as to the legitimate ownership of a guide or assistance dog.

The following link can be used to download an example of the book as issued by the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association. Each AD (UK) training organisation will issue similar books, the main difference being the information provided by each organisation, about the dog and owner under the data seal on the front and back inside cover page.

Example ID book (PDF 8MB) as issued by Guide Dogs PDF.

This book does not constitute any rights, and other documentary evidence may have to be obtained from guide or assistance dog owners or their training organisation, if they are not in possession of this form of ID, but have dogs trained by the representative organisations.

The ID book should be considered by service providers who require evidence of a dogs training and or the organisation who trained them, as sufficient documentary evidence of a dog’s legitimacy as being trained by a training organisation under the membership of Assistance Dogs (UK).